How to Choose a Microblading Training

Success is no accident to find great training, you must do your research. Starting your career on the right note is crucial to your success as an artist. Here’s what to look for in Microblading Training.

 
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It takes time to learn skin and all the possible roadblocks or issues that can arise with each individual client and there needs it’s something you can’t learn just in 2 Days.

So, you’ve decided you want to pursue a career in the Microblading industry and you’re ready to start looking for training programs. Microblading can be an extremely rewarding career with an important opportunity to shape and transform one of the most important features of a person’s face: the brows. But you have to remember - you will be tattooing someone’s face, and it shouldn’t be taken lightly and has a very heavy responsibility.

You’ll want to make sure that you get the best possible training for your hard-earned money. After all, this is your education, and the very beginning of your business, not to mention, someone’s future brows hang in the balance of your training and skill.

But, with so much out there, how do you find the right training?

A lot of artists tell us that although they’ve taken a few beginning classes and have had a lot of practice time on skin sheets and other practice pads, they don’t feel nearly ready to take clients due to lack of comprehensive and supervised training.

To feel comfortable performing microblading on a client, one needs adequate training and experience. Think about this: It is common for tattoo artists to apprentice for years before they can even touch skin with a needle.  Learning the correct technique and how to deal with issues that you may encounter on a daily basis with clients, is key.

 
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Bottom line, it takes TIME...Learning the skin and experiencing all of the possible roadblocks or issues that can arise with each individual client and their different needs is something you can’t learn in a week.

With little to no-regulation on becoming a trainer, 2-day training courses are popping up everywhere. People realize they can make just as much or more money training as they can actually performing procedures, which is harder and much more intimidating. This is leading to so much inadequate training and disregard for real foundational knowledge required to perform this procedure. People are going out into the field confused and unprepared.

Finding the right training course is not going to be easy and it’s not going to be cheap. However, if this is something that you truly want to do and want to succeed in, it is crucial that you invest the proper time and money in finding an amazing training course.

When looking for the right program, ask these questions:

Ideally, a minimum of 5 years of full-time experience with a combination of permanent makeup and microblading is a good start. If the instructor doesn’t have that experience or is reluctant to tell you exactly how much experience they’ve had, consider taking a pass on their training course.

It’s also important to note that although years of experience is a factor, it’s more important to have a microblading artist who has performed at least 2 years’ worth of procedures-that is the only way a person has the experience to prepare you for the various roadblocks you will encounter by touching a lot of skin and going through many touch-ups on the same client, and seeing how the pigments age over time.

 
 
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What is the class size? How many students to instructors?

A smaller course allows for not only more intimacy, but students can ask more questions and will receive a lot more one-on-one attention and supervision than they would in a larger class. A good ratio for the lecture and theory part of training is no more than five students to one instructor. While doing live models, the best is one-to-one supervision so the instructor is able to guide your every move.

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Daly B